The scammers are getting smart, some are beginning to create fake Yahoo accounts and calling themselves doctors (like Dr. Moses Coleman) to target chiropractic classified ads posted, in hopes of separating you from your money.

This morning I received two separate e-mails from chiropractors receiving replies to equipment for sale advertisements they had placed, both were from the same individual, and they were both scams.

The initial contact began like this…

How are you doing? Am writing you in regards to your posting on here and i’m interested in buying the item for one of my cousins.I want to know if the item is still available,if yes,Pls do get back to me with the detail and the last price of the item.Hope to read from you and have a wonderful and productive day.

Thanks

Dr Moses
drmosescoleman@yahoo.com

Nigeria-Abuja-Emerging-MarketsIP address information tells us where this e-mail comes from

Fortunately, we trace IP addresses in an effort to determine where e-mails are being sent from. Nothing personally against Nigeria but in 12+ years I’ve yet to see anything legitimate come from the area in the way of e-mail related to classified ads. It’s safe to assume they are always a scam and they appreciate that chiropractors report these e-mails.

If you weren’t tipped off yet that this was a scam, take a look at the response e-mail that is sent…

Thanks for the response to my introductory email..I am pretty cool with the price and condition and i am buying this for my cousin but my mode of payment will be the Most acceptable,safer and reliable means of payment which is United state certified money order/cashier check…Also,i am going to add $40 to the price for you to withdraw the advert from site.Please do get back to me with your name and address along with your phone number so that payment can be sent to you as early as possible and i will have my shipper come to pick up the item once you receive and clear the payment….And if you have a picture of the item,kindly attached with your response so that i can send it to my cousin.

Kindest Regards,

Dr Moses Coleman <drmosescoleman@yahoo.com>

Classic attributes of a classified ad scam include purchasing for third-party (like an uncle or cousin), use of money order or cashiers check, and financial incentive to withdraw the advertisement from the site (in this case $40). The scammers almost always ask for a photo of the item to be attached. Some people like to screw around with the scammers and send all sorts of photos of odd items, I’d recommend reporting their e-mail and moving forward. Dealing locally is and always possible but it is preferred.

For chiropractors, I always recommend starting a conversation in e-mail that typically only chiropractors would be able to have the answers to. Nowadays it’s pretty easy to determine whether a chiropractors business address exists or not, simply by searching for that information. No need to be scammed, but this is the Internet, you always have to be on the lookout.